Getting to grips with Broomstick Crochet…

The next crochet technique I need to learn as part of the crochet course I’m doing is Broomstick Crochet. I have never tried this technique before (and I hadn’t really ever heard of it either) so it was a completely new skill for me to learn from scratch. The technique was traditionally worked using a broomstick handle to create the large loops, hence the term ‘Broomstick’. Nowadays we have very large knitting needles that we can use to create the loops instead.

P1110345

Now, I have to admit I have found it a tricky technique to master. I have struggled to find a comfortable position in which to hold the large knitting needle. I have a 20mm wooden knitting needle and above  you can see my first attempt using 4ply cotton and a 3.5mm crochet hook.

Then on to my second attempt…

P1110366

Not entirely happy with this finished sample (and I restarted it numerous times!) I tried again, this time using a thicker Aran weight yarn and a 5.5mm hook…

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A little happier with this result but not 100% satisfied I succumbed to YouTube videos for tips. This always leads to further confusion as each video I watched had different instructions, suggestions and advice. So I tried to pick the best of them all, plus the crochet books and a magazine I had to read up on the technique, and I produced my final sample…

P1110367This one I’m happy with and I’ll be submitting it later this week. I went back to a 4 ply yarn but used a wool instead of cotton which seemed to produce a neater result (or maybe I was just starting to get the hang of it!)

Have any of you tried Broomstick crochet and how did you get on? Any advice or suggestions gratefully received!

Happy crocheting Everyone 🙂

 

35 thoughts on “Getting to grips with Broomstick Crochet…

  1. Your final square looks fantastic and so neat! I did start a cardigan in broomstick crochet years ago but I never finished it! I think I still have the pattern somewhere. I can’t even remember if I enjoyed it or not but I guess not as I never finished it 🙂

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  2. I like the look of broomstick crochet, but it was my least favourite of the alternative methods of crochet we need to do for IDC. In fact, I have yet to do the broomstick samples for part 2 – I’m putting it off. I’m not even sure I can remember how to do it!
    Your woolly sample looks good. I’m sure the neater finish is because it’s not done in cotton, which is quite an unforgiving yarn. As always with the work you show on your blog, I’m sure it’ll pass!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Ooh, well.. I’ve hit a brick wall mentally! The remaining samples I need to complete are mostly ones I’m not interested in (e.g. cross stitch on Tunisian crochet) and there’s so-o-o much I want to experiment with beyond the course – very distracting!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Very nice sample–even and intriguing. I’ve not done broomstick lace before but I believe my grandmother did something like this as there was a very large knitting needle among her things. She would give anything a try at least once!

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  4. Hi Eleonora. Those samples look great and the last one especially seems very even and straight-sided. Your work is beautifully done and looks stunning on the pebble beach. If I lived where you do all my time would be spent crocheting covers for pebbles! Since Christmas I’ve not done one but I’m hoping there might be more in-the-round techniques in Part 11 …. if I ever pass Part 1 that is! I’ve been bogged down a bit with my Tunisian samples and trying to achieve neat side edges – the stitches themselves are fine but getting an even tension is more challenging. Happy days!
    Jenny 🌸

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Jenny, thanks so much. Crocheting covers for pebbles sounds great! I’ve not tried that before. Hope your Tunisian samples are going ok. I’ve just got my result back for the Tunisian crochet shawl I did as one of the projects- thankfully it passed with a ‘very good’ as I wouldn’t have wanted to do that again! 🙂

      Like

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