Seaside Stash Busting Blanket – Week 22

IMG_6747We have some new rows again this week… these are my ‘ripples in the sand’! 🙂 You know when the tide is going out and the sea leaves those gorgeous patterned ripples in the sand…WP_20161220_16_07_46_Prop1150866I took these photos when we were staying along the south west coast of The Netherlands when we spent Christmas there in 2016 and I love the patterns in the sand… so how to capture this in our blanket? Well I’ve gone for a ‘Raised Ripple’ textured stitch. These rows are actually quite simple and are made up of 6 rows in total with only 2 being a little more complicated. I’ve done a YouTube tutorial below but first here’s the usual round-up of blankets being shared over on Instagram– lots of amazing outside photos being shared!

IMG_7477So at the end of Row 90 you should have joined with a new colour and made 3ch which counts as the first tr of this next row. Remember its UK crochet terminology.

RdtrF: Raised double treble Front: complete a double treble st as normal but insert hook around the stem of the st inserting hook from right to left going from the front to the back and then round to the front again.

The first 2 rows are very simple…

Row 91 1tr in each st to end, 1ch (counts as first dc of next row – you may want to put a stitch marker in this ch so it is easier to recognise as a stitch when crocheting back into it later), turn (180 sts)

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Row 92 1dc in each st to end, 3ch, turn (180 sts)

IMG_6565And now to create the texture in this next row…

Row 93 Miss next st working 1RdtrF around tr below it from Row 91, continue with (1tr in next st as normal, miss next st working 1RdtrF around tr below it from Row 91) to final 2 sts, 1 tr in each of final 2 sts, 1ch (counts as first dc of next row – you may want to put a stitch marker in this ch so it is easier to recognise as a stitch when crocheting back into it later), turn (180 sts)

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Row 94 1dc in each st to end, 3ch, turn

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Row 95 1tr in next st, miss next st working 1RdtrF around tr below it from Row 93, continue with (1tr in next st, miss next st working 1RdtrF around tr below it from Row 93) to end of row, 1tr in final st, 1ch (counts as first dc of next row – you may want to put a stitch marker in this ch so it is easier to recognise as a stitch when crocheting back into it later), turn

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Row 96 1dc in each st to end, join with a new colour at end of final st, 3ch, turn (180 sts)

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And there you have it… enjoy! 🙂 🙂

8 comments

  1. I am enjoying seeing and hearing about the things that inspire you to create crochet rows. I have a fabulous photo of a beach in France that had similar ripples on the sand – one of those things that probably changes a little on every tide – nature is amazing, isn’t it?

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  2. Oh another note – I love the crochet decorations on the stones in the header of your blog page – I am pretty sure you did a post about making them – if so, is there a pattern, and can you direct me to the month so I can look it up and put it on my list of things to do? If I am mistaken and the pattern is just yours to enjoy, then forgive me for asking – I shall just continue to admire when I read new posts! I have been challenged to do a little crochet, was thinking mastering something small might be the way to begin.I have not done much more than a granny square in the past and that was some time ago, wielding one stick and not two I know for me might be a challenge (am a knitter of many years!). Thanks in advance

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    1. How fabulous that you’re thinking about venturing into crochet!! I knitted long before I crocheted Tinaor… but I haven’t picked up knitting needles in well over 4 years now as crochet just took over!! Here’s a link to the blog post I did about the pebbles…https://coastalcrochet.com/2018/02/26/crocheting-around-pebbles/
      I did write up the patterns and its for sale over on my Ravelry and Etsy stores… If you’ve mastered a granny square then these pebble overs are easy to achieve! 🙂

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      1. Thank you so much ! My husband often wonders why I pick up stones and shells from many beaches I go to (not too many at a time, of course, wouldn’t want to change the way natural beaches occur around the world). Now I can tell him not only do I ‘just collect them’ but some might even be enhanced in my collection.

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